medical Law

Obama Care: A Pyrrhic Victory in Medical Law

Christensen Law Reviews Changes In Medical Law

In this post, Christensen Law reviews how medical law has changed due to how healthcare has evolved overtime. The Obama Care medical law has been the center of controversy ever since its inception. The idea of universal healthcare is an idea many would favor, but its practicality has always been debated.

Compiled by: D. Wade Christensen, JD, J. Clay Christensen, JD, Blake D. Christensen, DO, L. Nazette Zuhdi, JD, LLM, Adam W. Christensen, JD, MBA, and S. Sandy Sanbar, MD, PhD, JD

President Ronald Reagan was deeply opposed to the creation of Medicare, which he viewed as the sun setting on America’s future. In 1965 under the Presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson, Congress had created Medicare under Title XVII of the Social Security Act to provide health insurance to people age 65 and older, regardless of income or medical history.

Approximately 19 million people received Medicare in 1966. Before Medicare’s creation, only half of older adults had health insurance, with coverage either unavailable or unaffordable to the other half. Medicare was expanded in 1972 and again in 2001. In 2010, 48 million Americans received healthcare through Medicare. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010 is the most significant healthcare legislation since the creation of Medicare.

Beginning in 2014, the ACA requires most Americans under age 65 years to have health insurance or face financial penalties. On June 28, 2012, the U.S. Supreme Court declared the ACA in toto as constitutional, including the individual mandate which was permissible under the taxation powers of Congress as defined by the Constitution. President Obama, himself a constitutional scholar, and the Democrats in Congress were relieved, pleased, and gratified by the favorable Supreme Court decision, especially that the majority of the Justices (five) are appointees of Republican Presidents. But the Republicans in Congress have vowed to continue to “fight the battle” to repeal the ACA.

Is the Supreme Court ACA landmark decision a Pyrrhic victory for President Obama’s signature piece of legislation?

One can say that the President’s victory comes “with such a devastating cost that it carries the implication that another such victory will ultimately lead to defeat. Someone who wins a ‘Pyrrhic victory’ has been victorious in some way; however, the heavy toll and/or the detrimental consequences negate any sense of achievement or profit. There is, therefore, no reason to celebrate.” If the President is victorious in one more major and “politically destructive” and “financially costly and debilitating” battle with the Republicans, will he be utterly ruined?

In 280 BC, the army of King Pyrrhus of Epirus, an ancient Greek state, suffered irreplaceable casualties in defeating the Romans in two battles during the Pyrrhic War. Instead of being joyful of his victory, he allegedly stated that one more such victory would utterly undo him or another such victory and I come back to Epirus alone. He had lost a great part of the Greek forces, commanders and friends that he brought with him, with no recruits in sight. In contrast, the Roman camp was quickly and plentifully filled up with fresh men, not at all abating in courage for the loss they sustained, but even from their very anger gaining new force and resolution to go on with the war.

The ACA will, among other things, help over 40 million Americans without health insurance, do away with inequities of pre-existing conditions, and encourage medical students to choose primary care specialties. The ACA will impact physicians who serve uninsured and lower-income patients. It may also calm political and economic anxiety among the broader population of physicians who are unwilling or undecided about undertaking difficult and costly practice transformations to better coordinate care for patients. To some, the ACA is a step toward assuring the availability of health care to all as a universal goal. Health care, to others, is a right and not a privilege. Regardless, it must be provided in a way that is financially responsible. ‰

Select References: http://www.larrydewitt.net/Essays/Reagan.htm The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act – Public Law 111-148. 124 Stat. 119 through 124 Stat. 1025 (906 pages) http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2012/06/28/supreme-court-upholdspresident-obamas-health-care-reform

Reflecting on this article, one may see that medical law is a complicated area of law that’s only getting more complicated with each passing year. If you are in need of assistance with matters pertaining to healthcare law , the lawyers at Christensen Law would be happy to help you. Please click here to contact us.